Sport

Why Rugby Is a Great Discipline for Kids

There is a wide range of benefits for children playing rugby, including widening their social skills and improving self-esteem, fitness levels, and tactical skills on the field. Engaging in rugby can help improve children’s concentration, and it can assist them in the analysis of situations.

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There Are Physical Health Benefits to Rugby

Rugby has a range of health benefits for all ages, and that includes children. The more physical exercise on the field and fresh air they get, the healthier they will be as they grow up. Development of those all-important social skills is an essential aspect of a child’s life, and he or she can benefit from playing rugby. The bonding as a team can make young people feel good, and rewards too can boost self-esteem.

Self-esteem and confidence can be raised by regular participation in rugby. Even small goals such as honing a particular skill can be a milestone for a child. Furthermore, many sports such as rugby have life lessons, such as teamwork, camaraderie and the experience of the downside of losing.

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There are some who view rugby as a particularly dangerous sport for children to take part in, but experts say that rugby is one of the best sports and opportunities that a child can enjoy. It is a non-contact sport up to the age of nine, and it’s not until the age of eleven that it becomes a tackle sport. By then, children will have gained many key skills on the field, and serious injuries can, therefore, be avoided.

Young People Have Positive Role Models in Rugby Coaches and Professionals

There is also the likelihood that children will see positive role models taking part in the sport. These could be professionals on television or even coaches or former club players. Coaches wishing to use creative rugby training drills can visit a variety of providers, including https://www.sportplan.net/drills/rugby.

According to BBC News, Japanese children have made Welsh rugby players feel at home with a rendition of the popular Welsh hymn Calon Lan. The team was training in Japan ahead of the opening of the Rugby World Cup.

Above all, exercise and other physical activities release endorphins, which are chemicals in the brain. Endorphins also create a positive, happy feeling in our bodies, so junior rugby players can benefit from better health overall.

 

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